7 THINGS YOU DIDN’T KNOW ABOUT THE CIVIL WAR

“THERE WERE MORE THAN 3,000 BLACK SLAVE-OWNERS WHO LIVED IN THE SOUTH”
 

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With all of the controversy surrounding the Confederate Flag, and with Apple Inc. now removing all civil war related games from their app offerings, we have reached a point where propaganda has begun to outweigh the real truth.

The following seven points from Daniel Ameduri of Future Money Trends is an effort to clear up some of the erroneous information being disseminated by agenda-driven politicos and activists:

1. The SLAVE states of Maryland, Missouri, Delaware, Kentucky, as well as the District of Columbia, were SLAVE STATES in the Union that fought for the NORTH.

2. Two years after the Emancipation Proclamation was made in 1863, the Union states of Delaware and Kentucky continued to have slavery until the Thirteenth Amendment was passed that abolished slavery.
The Emancipation Proclamation only freed Confederate slaves. It was Lincoln’s punishment for them, but it didn’t affect the slaves that remained in union control, including New Orleans, Tennessee, or Norfolk, Virginia, which were under the control of Union armies.

3. A year into the war, President Lincoln wrote a letter to the New York Tribune stating, “If I could save the Union without freeing any slave, I would do it; and if I could save it by freeing all the slaves, I would do it; and if I could save it by freeing some and leaving others alone, I would also do that.” Not exactly a civil rights leader…
Lincoln opposed inter-racial marriages, supported the Illinois Constitution’s prohibition of immigration of blacks into the state, defended a slave owner who was seeking to retrieve his runaway slaves but never defended slaves or runaways themselves, and he was a lifelong advocate of colonization — of sending every last black person in the U.S. to Africa, Haiti, or central America — anywhere but in the United States.

4. Most white southern families had no slaves, which means most white soldiers in the south had no slaves.
And they definitely didn’t have slaves like some of the NORTHERN army soldiers who were from the states of Delaware, Maryland, Missouri, and Kentucky.
According to the census of the entire United States, with 27 million people, about 1.4% were slave owners, or 4.8% of southern whites owned slaves.
http://americancivilwar.com/authors/black_slaveowners.htm

5. Here is something you won’t learn about in Black History Month: There were over 3,000 BLACK slave owners who lived in the south.
According to the U.S. census, in South Carolina in 1830, about a fourth of the negro slave masters owned 10 or more slaves.

6. The north had laws preventing “free” black people from actually getting rights as citizens.
Two acts of Congress were passed during the Civil War, one in 1864 and one in 1866, which allowed slave owners whose slaves enlisted or were drafted into the Union military to file a claim against the federal government for loss of the slave’s services.

7. Abraham Lincoln was a tyrant and acted as America’s first dictator…
He arrested Maryland legislators to prevent them from voting on secession. He shut down at least 300 northern newspapers opposing his war policies. He imprisoned 10,000 Union citizens without due process of law. And he even provoked the south into war, even after North Carolina, Tennessee, Arkansas, and Virginia voted to stay in the Union.

Comment (1)

  1. Dr. TCH

    Not sure about all of the details listed here, but it does seem that the “War between the States” was primarily an economic conflct, that both sides were financed by Britain, and that Lincoln acted as a tyrant. There is a HUGE amount of revisionist history.

    E.g., the Pearl Harbor attack and “9-11” were “false flag” events…by now, nicely documented, yet this fact is rarely mentioned in the media or in motion pictures. The movie “Pearl Harbor” is a piece of jingoist junk. The story about the Navy Seal assassination of bin Laden was a lie, as the victim succumbed to kidney disease some years earlier. There was a coup d ‘etat in Dallas in 1963…as documented by people like Mark Lane, medical examiner Dr. Cyril Wecht, and Col. L. Fletcher Prouty.

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